Summer 2018 transfer window

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I would love this to be us.

I hate his attitude
I doubt we'd pay his wages
Everything about his personalty is the polar opposite of what Poch wishes to install in his players.
Hes clearly past his best and no way has the fitness that Poch would demand.

But i would still love this to be us. Yaya and Mousa could do 45 mins each.
 

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BangkokSpud

Supporter
Tottenham have tied highly rated youngsters Oliver Skipp, Luke Amos and Timothy Eyoma down to new contracts.

The trio have penned new three-year deals, committing their futures to the club until 2021.
 
Spurs have 20 Overseas Trained Players (as defined by CL Rules) of which only 17 can be registered and play - under PL definitions we have 18 players and can fit 17 into our squad.

So as it stands 3 of the players cannot be registered for CL.

IMO the likely shortlist seems to be :

N'Koudou (winger - Spurs have plenty of better AM options)

Foyth (least experienced in the squad, but our 4th available CB)

Llorente (Back up striker, unless we depend on Son and Moura)

Sissoko (played previously as right sided AM - now competing with Moura and Lamela - or CM - where we have Dembele, Winks, Wanyama, Dier with Onomah, Amos and Skipp awaiting, the last 2 having their contracts extended by 3 years today so in Poch's thoights). So arguably no longer required.

Aurier (erratic RB who Poch could with coaching get to a 7/10 consistent RB, but Walker-Peters has 2 MOTM performances in 6 matches and is home grown, so arguably position covered)

So I'm expecting at least one of these to leave by Friday when most european TW's close, but which THREE would you expect to be sold/loaned out or not registered to play in CL ? .
 

Anyone pay for Times Subscription? if so could you copy and paste, as might be an interesting read.
I'm generally pro-Levy and and thought the window went okay because we didn't sell anyone and they are making a big impact (Toby, Dembele, Rose to a lesser extent).

But to act like what Tottenham did was "genius" is absurd. We absolutely need to bring in reinforcements for CM and CB. Toby could still be gone next summer and Dembele isn't getting any healthier. We've started the season well but its a small sample size. Let's see where we are after the Christmas period.

Edit: I did not read the article, I am merely reacting to the description in the twitter link. So it may be a bit more than that, to be fair.
 

Anyone pay for Times Subscription? if so could you copy and paste, as might be an interesting read.


“Like most people, I have always had great affection for The Wizard of Oz. Great performances, great soundtrack, Judy Garland, what’s not to like? The idea at the centre of the film, of course, is the wizard. A magician. A maker of dreams. Someone who could make everything right. The Lion would find his courage, the Scarecrow would discover his brain, and the Tin Man his heart.

In some ways, Oz’s Emerald City was a metaphor for the United States, the new republic, where people from around the world gazed, and often travelled, hoping for a better life. It harked back too to the story of Dick Whittington and the fable of London, where “the streets were paved with gold”.

But the new is not always what it seems. The wizard was a fiction. In London the streets were not paved with gold. The moral in each case is that we cannot change our circumstances if we do not first change ourselves. There is no conjuror who can magically alter who we are, no city that will endow us with treasure. To transform ourselves we sometimes have to look within.

Football, in many ways, is the new Oz. I am not sure there is any supporter who has not wondered if there may be a magician who could take them to the new uplands, or at least a higher division. The fetishisation with the new is so intense that coaches have often been fired before they have stepped over the threshold of the training ground. If the new guy has not worked his magic in the first couple of games, perhaps there is no magic after all. Let’s look again. The rainbow is not far away.

Coaches are themselves also subject to this central delusion. Instead of improving the players that they already have, patiently striving for excellence, their eyes are fixated on the transfer market. They want that new player who can take the club over the rainbow: a new striker; a new defender; perhaps a new midfield pair. Wouldn’t they solve all our problems? And sometimes, of course, they can.

But, over the summer, Tottenham Hotspur took a different approach. They looked at the transfer window, decided that nobody was quite right, at least not at the right price, so they did not purchase anyone. This may sound logical, indeed rational, but it was greeted with astonishment. Amazement. Horror.

They haven’t signed anyone? Have they lost their marbles? Where is their ambition? In football the quest for upheaval is not the exception; it is the norm.

Now, three games into a new season, and it may turn out that, when other competitions start and injuries bite, Spurs will find themselves thin on the ground. But there is nevertheless something philosophically interesting — perhaps even valuable — about their approach. For the act of not signing players has its own logic, and its own implications.

It means that the coaches have to focus on developing the players that they already have. To put it another way, they have to reach for the new by unlocking value in the old. The players have a different perspective too, as Harry Kane put it so eloquently on Monday after their 3-0 victory over Manchester United. “We have to justify the faith the club has put in us,” he said. “We have to step up.”

This is somewhat different to the mood at United, where the players know that the manager thinks that they are rubbish because he spends most of his time not just fixated on the transfer market but blaming the owners for not giving him a host of new players over and above the £400 million that he has already spent. This is hardly — how shall we put this? — a vote of confidence. And is it any surprise that José Mourinho has done precious little to improve his players? If anything, they have deteriorated.

Spurs have taken the opposite trajectory. Lucas Moura was a revelation on Monday, perhaps the performance of the season so far. Kane seized his opportunity with precision. Other players have improved mightily under Mauricio Pochettino, not least Kieran Trippier, an outstanding right back, and Jan Vertonghen, Spurs’ player of last season. The more that the squad plays together, the more it develops mutual understanding, and with players coming back from injury and into form, they have fresh options in an already cohesive group.

In May a leading website posted a graphic that ranked clubs by points over the previous two seasons along with net spend. Spurs were out on top with 163 points with a net spend of £7 million. Other teams had fewer points but almost all had a higher spend. United, for instance, had 150 points with a net spend of £153 million. Woolwich were 138 points and £97 million. This was, unsurprisingly, taken as evidence that Spurs had overperformed relative to their modest outlay. What few considered is that these may have been related. Spurs performed better, in part because they spent less.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I do not wish to overextend the argument. Spurs may have had a great points total over two seasons, but they have not won the league for yonks. Moreover, great teams have always demonstrated a sensible synthesis between improving the old and signing the new. Sir Alex Ferguson encouraged existing players to develop their games, but also made big statements in the market. He broke the transfer record on numerous occasions, not least with Rio Ferdinand. Fresh faces, fresh ideas and fresh legs can often prove invaluable. Spurs would certainly be unwise to allow the lack of activity in the most recent transfer window to become a precedent for the next.

My point, really, is that in a world of dwindling attention spans, 24-hour news and the tyranny of social media, we are too often focused not on improving ourselves but looking for quick fixes. We want new uplands without first sowing the seeds. We want a bumper crop without feeding the soil. We want the spoils of the harvest without demonstrating the patience to let it grow.

After all, the rainbow (and this is why it is such a wonderful metaphor), seems so tantalisingly near. My two kids, four and five, still run towards it after a storm, expecting to touch its magical fabric. And yet it recedes with every step, eluding their touch, confounding their expectation.

Football, it seems to me, needs to relearn this lesson. Management is not just about buying and selling but coaching and nurturing. Oz has to be built. It cannot always simply be bought.”
 
I'm generally pro-Levy and and thought the window went okay because we didn't sell anyone and they are making a big impact (Toby, Dembele, Rose to a lesser extent).

But to act like what Tottenham did was "genius" is absurd. We absolutely need to bring in reinforcements for CM and CB. Toby could still be gone next summer and Dembele isn't getting any healthier. We've started the season well but its a small sample size. Let's see where we are after the Christmas period.

Edit: I did not read the article, I am merely reacting to the description in the twitter link. So it may be a bit more than that, to be fair.
We may well have wanted to bring in reinforcements and CB and CM , but with Spurs already having 20 Overseas Trained players for 17 spots (per CL rules), without selling or loaning out some of those, we would be restricted to buying 'Homegrown players' and with the exception of probably a handful of players none of them would have improved our squad. And that handful, the prime example being Grealish was not eventually available, and even if available would have been one needing polishing up.

I think Spurs assumption going into the window was that Dembele and/or Alderweireld would move freeing up a squad place for an overseas trained player.

When that didn't happen, and a lack of viable homegrown players available, we decided we were better off with the squad we had until at least January.

Not a bad option to have - but only possible as we have a decent first team now plus some depth from previous TW's.
 
Isn’t the transfer window meant to be shut? I thought Prem teams can’t bring anyone in now?
Anyone signed now by a PL club cannot be registered and play in PL for them until January
Not strictly true. Anyone who became a free agent during the transfer window can be signed at any time. If he only became a free agent after the window had closed then no Premier League club would be able to sign him until January, but he was already unattached so can be signed by anyone.
 

Totti

Chess extraordinaire
Yeah, Premier League clubs won't be able to sign out-of-contract players until January.

Only Football League clubs can sign free agents until the end of August.

In years gone by, clubs were able to sign free agents at any point, but clubs under orders to submit their 25-man squads, this is no longer permitted.
 

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Yeah, Premier League clubs won't be able to sign out-of-contract players until January.

Only Football League clubs can sign free agents until the end of August.

In years gone by, clubs were able to sign free agents at any point, but clubs under orders to submit their 25-man squads, this is no longer permitted.
As long as there's a free slot in the 25 man squad, and it confirms with the rules on homegrown players, you can still register a free agent.
 
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