New Stadium

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shempz

Supporter
Can't stand up, can't say Yid....

Just about had enough of this shit to be honest.

Sit down and shut up, or I'll have you thrown out just so some day tripper can sit in peace and quietly eat their popcorn in your place. Remember, I know where you sit (admittedly, this could backfire on me, as you also know where I sit)
 

shempz

Supporter
There is a flaw in their email:

"we fully expect fans will rise up from their seats during key moments of the match"

For me, every second of every game is a key moment. I shall therefore take this as their approval to stand all the time.
 

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Ahab

Scientists say.....
Tottenham Hotspur will refinance more than GBP400m with Bank of America borrowed to pay for their GBP1b new stadium in north London that opened earlier this year, The Athletic reports without attribution.
New private placement will turn that debt into bonds with staggered maturities between 15 and 30 years, rather than in 2022 under previous terms
Champions League finalist soccer team has sought to take advantage of low interest rates in the U.S.
Tottenham and Bank of America each declined to comment to The Athletic

Makes sense. The 2yr bond yield is currently around 1.53% vs 2.07% in the 30yr, Ergo, the spread (differential) is 0.54%, much lower than the 2.04% back at the very end of 2016 & even the 0.8% a month ago.
It makes a lot of sense to refinance the loan and pay it back over a longer time period at these crazily low rates. The repayments in 20 years time could end up being peanuts. Anyway Mr Naylor, care to take a guess at the fee the bank of America will charge for the refinancing? Extricating ourselves from the Libor link is a big plus as well.
 

Nutter-Naylor

Supporter
It makes a lot of sense to refinance the loan and pay it back over a longer time period at these crazily low rates. The repayments in 20 years time could end up being peanuts. Anyway Mr Naylor, care to take a guess at the fee the bank of America will charge for the refinancing? Extricating ourselves from the Libor link is a big plus as well.
Not yet but will keep my ear to the ground.
 

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