English football's next great dynasty

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Leicester have likely secured the title this season, and good luck to them for fulfilling that fairy tale; they've proved that good old fashioned pragmatism and playing to your strengths rather than the obligatory 'good' football can neutralise financial supremacy, but ultimately they've overachieved and Spurs' continued progress under Pocchettino will gradually peak and sustain, finally filling void left by the Ferguson-era United as English football's next great dynasty.

The parallels between United in the early 90's and the current Tottenham team are startling; intense, principled managers who've paid their dues and worked their way up the ladder, who've weened the negative influences out of the club and established a young British core of the team who're developing in sync, ala the class of '92, alongside some shrewdly acquired foreign talent. Both are built on solid defensive foundations and play with width and dynamism, constantly switching the play and firing crosses into the box until the opposition succumb to the pressure. Another common element is the adulation they receive from Sky; Chelsea, Woolwich and City have all managed to attain a degree of success during the Sky Sports era, but they've never really been as emphatically embraced by them in the way United were, and in my opinion the reason are obvious and fully justified. Those clubs have all had an overly-cosmopolitan aura, and in the case of City and Chelsea a vulgar approach to buying the success with their benefactor's wealth with little regard to the overall benefit to the English game; this Spurs team, like that United one, has an authentic Anglo-identity that is greatly benefitting the English game and providing opportunity to young domestic talent, while gradually establishing success built on solid foundations via hard work, shrewd transfer strategy and impeccable standards imposed by the managers. United's demise means Sky need new poster boys to project, and humble starlets like Kane, Alli and Dier are the ideal candidates.

As a City fan back when we prided ourselves on being a 'proper' club, as well as an advocate of fundamental opportunity for English talent, it's been hard to watch the transition into an embodiment of everything that's wrong with modern football, and I've spent the past few years being told by the hypocritical morons that most of our fans have become that selling our arse to an Arab was 'the only way' we could compete with the established top 4, as well as the nonsense argument that English players aren't good enough in failed justification for the Anglo-apartheid at the club since the Hispanic colonisation in 2013, so I've been buzzing with what this Spurs team has been doing to disprove that idiotic misconception, even to the extent where I actually enjoyed you lot taking 6 points of us this season.

Moving forward, with the new stadium in the pipeline and the Nike investment in addition to the Champions League revenue, there is absolutely no reason for Pocchettino or any of the aforementioned uber-talents to leave; constant exposure to elite level football via International and European competition is going to facilitate their development into top-level footballers, and as a result see the club become a dominant force in English and even European football. The similarities in style and standards between former Argentina teammates Pocchettino and Diego Simeone are glaringly obvious, and Spurs can easily embrace and emulate Atletico's impact in the Champions League next season.

Guardiola is put on a pedestal for his achievements at Barca, but he's only every inherited great players at clubs with a culture of winning; Pocchettino is Pep without the privileges. Would Guardiola have matched Pocchettino's achievements with Espanyol, Southampton and the shambles of a Spurs squad he took over? Success is relative, and the Argentinians work so far has been as good as anybody else's in the the same timescale.

From what little I've seen of Winks, Pritchard and Edwards, they have the talent to be integrated into the squad within the next few seasons and Pocchettino will inevitably do so, further strengthening that success-defining identity in the process; the key to completing the transition from very good team to winning team will be the quality and compatibility of the signings....

United needed a catalyst for their own transition in the early 90's, a talisman to inspire and implement a winning mentality into a talented young team and they found it in Cantona; Ibrahimovic could be that player here. He's a perennial winner, who sets and demands from others the highest standards; Kane could attain career-defining advice and experience alongside such a player, taking his own career beyond even it's current stratospheric potential. He's got a few years left in him, wants a move to England and would destroy most Premier League defences.

PSG want Lloris and this summer would likely see his value peak given his age and the fact he'll be a key figure for a France team that I expect to make a big impact at Euro 2016, so it'd be a good time to sell; Jack Butland's career trajectory will see him as England's number one by the 2018 World Cup, and he has all the credentials to be a Spurs player (ie young, English and superbly talented) as well as the physical stature to dominate the box better than Hugo. He'd realistically be available for half of what PSG would pay for Lloris as well.

When Bale was sold in 2013, I imagine the first option clause was nothing more than Levy being awkward and Real obliging to be polite, but given the bizarre change in the footballing landscape in England since then, and especially Spurs currently being the best placed team to dominate domestically as well as become perennial participants in the Champions League, the possibility of a Bale return is a valid one.

Regardless of what actually happens in the summer transfer-wise, you club is on the cusp of greatness and is without question the pride of English football.
 

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Leicester have likely secured the title this season, and good luck to them for fulfilling that fairy tale; they've proved that good old fashioned pragmatism and playing to your strengths rather than the obligatory 'good' football can neutralise financial supremacy, but ultimately they've overachieved and Spurs' continued progress under Pocchettino will gradually peak and sustain, finally filling void left by the Ferguson-era United as English football's next great dynasty.

The parallels between United in the early 90's and the current Tottenham team are startling; intense, principled managers who've paid their dues and worked their way up the ladder, who've weened the negative influences out of the club and established a young British core of the team who're developing in sync, ala the class of '92, alongside some shrewdly acquired foreign talent. Both are built on solid defensive foundations and play with width and dynamism, constantly switching the play and firing crosses into the box until the opposition succumb to the pressure. Another common element is the adulation they receive from Sky; Chelsea, Woolwich and City have all managed to attain a degree of success during the Sky Sports era, but they've never really been as emphatically embraced by them in the way United were, and in my opinion the reason are obvious and fully justified. Those clubs have all had an overly-cosmopolitan aura, and in the case of City and Chelsea a vulgar approach to buying the success with their benefactor's wealth with little regard to the overall benefit to the English game; this Spurs team, like that United one, has an authentic Anglo-identity that is greatly benefitting the English game and providing opportunity to young domestic talent, while gradually establishing success built on solid foundations via hard work, shrewd transfer strategy and impeccable standards imposed by the managers. United's demise means Sky need new poster boys to project, and humble starlets like Kane, Alli and Dier are the ideal candidates.

As a City fan back when we prided ourselves on being a 'proper' club, as well as an advocate of fundamental opportunity for English talent, it's been hard to watch the transition into an embodiment of everything that's wrong with modern football, and I've spent the past few years being told by the hypocritical morons that most of our fans have become that selling our arse to an Arab was 'the only way' we could compete with the established top 4, as well as the nonsense argument that English players aren't good enough in failed justification for the Anglo-apartheid at the club since the Hispanic colonisation in 2013, so I've been buzzing with what this Spurs team has been doing to disprove that idiotic misconception, even to the extent where I actually enjoyed you lot taking 6 points of us this season.

Moving forward, with the new stadium in the pipeline and the Nike investment in addition to the Champions League revenue, there is absolutely no reason for Pocchettino or any of the aforementioned uber-talents to leave; constant exposure to elite level football via International and European competition is going to facilitate their development into top-level footballers, and as a result see the club become a dominant force in English and even European football. The similarities in style and standards between former Argentina teammates Pocchettino and Diego Simeone are glaringly obvious, and Spurs can easily embrace and emulate Atletico's impact in the Champions League next season.

Guardiola is put on a pedestal for his achievements at Barca, but he's only every inherited great players at clubs with a culture of winning; Pocchettino is Pep without the privileges. Would Guardiola have matched Pocchettino's achievements with Espanyol, Southampton and the shambles of a Spurs squad he took over? Success is relative, and the Argentinians work so far has been as good as anybody else's in the the same timescale.

From what little I've seen of Winks, Pritchard and Edwards, they have the talent to be integrated into the squad within the next few seasons and Pocchettino will inevitably do so, further strengthening that success-defining identity in the process; the key to completing the transition from very good team to winning team will be the quality and compatibility of the signings....

United needed a catalyst for their own transition in the early 90's, a talisman to inspire and implement a winning mentality into a talented young team and they found it in Cantona; Ibrahimovic could be that player here. He's a perennial winner, who sets and demands from others the highest standards; Kane could attain career-defining advice and experience alongside such a player, taking his own career beyond even it's current stratospheric potential. He's got a few years left in him, wants a move to England and would destroy most Premier League defences.

PSG want Lloris and this summer would likely see his value peak given his age and the fact he'll be a key figure for a France team that I expect to make a big impact at Euro 2016, so it'd be a good time to sell; Jack Butland's career trajectory will see him as England's number one by the 2018 World Cup, and he has all the credentials to be a Spurs player (ie young, English and superbly talented) as well as the physical stature to dominate the box better than Hugo. He'd realistically be available for half of what PSG would pay for Lloris as well.

When Bale was sold in 2013, I imagine the first option clause was nothing more than Levy being awkward and Real obliging to be polite, but given the bizarre change in the footballing landscape in England since then, and especially Spurs currently being the best placed team to dominate domestically as well as become perennial participants in the Champions League, the possibility of a Bale return is a valid one.

Regardless of what actually happens in the summer transfer-wise, you club is on the cusp of greatness and is without question the pride of English football.
What a great post.. The best post from a non-Spurs fan I've ever seen on this forum.
 
Was with you until you advocated selling Hugo to get Ibra. No. We don't need Ibra. If we were to get that talisman that you speak of it would probably best be suited to a midfield role, not a striker. Ibra would demand exorbitant wages only to be second fiddle to Kane.

In regards to the English core. If we can keep Walker, Rose, Dier, Alli & Kane together, I think we can win the league. But it's a big if. I feel that clubs will certainly be looking at Alli, Dier & Kane for sure. Yes, you can argue that they have no reason to leave, as we are on the rise and in the champions league, but when Barca, Real etc come knocking, it is difficult to turn that prestige down. With the increasing commoditisation of football, I would be elated and staggered if we managed to keep them all playing for us in the long term. I don't see anyone leaving this coming season however.
 
Great post. Agree with the sentiment of an English core of players - it's refreshing in this day and age. Poch as the new Fergie - that would be a dream come true. Have always wanted a 'dynasty' manager at Tottenham.
 

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Great post. But like others have said, you lost me at Ibra. First off, he doesn't fit our style at all. Secondly, just because there's similarities to where we are now to early Fergie United, doesn't mean we need to take the same route as United from here. Poch is about finding talent, in the academy or from outside, and molding them into 11 talismen; not buying one.

Even if anyone is inclined to agree that we need a talisman, we're more priviliged than Fergie was, in that we've already got a talisman readymade. Young, English, homegrown, talented, believes in the team ethos, and works his socks off. What could possibly be more what we and Poch are about?
 
I'm sure Ibrahimovich is exactly the player that Pochettino wants in his team

Turns slower than milk
Runs even slower
Total egotist and self centred
Thinks pressing is what his maid does to his clothes
Massive salary expectations
Barking mad
wears his hair in a pony tail
Uglier than a fight at a gypsy wedding

checks all of Mauricio's boxes I'm sure.

However - I think the point was more about striker support than the mental fruitcake he threw in as an option.

As for Hugo - not sure why he would want to move to PSG apart from the massive salary, being back in his native country, playing in their equivalent of wembley and being the national team captain.

Maybe looking around for a replacement might not be such a bad idea - after all.
 
Was thinking of the parallels between us and Utd in 1992 when they lost out to un-fancied Leeds led by Cantona, Strachan, McAllister, and Chapman. Utd came back the following year, in the inaugural Premier League season and after the master stroke signing of Cantona for about £1.7m they finally won that elusive league title. Coming this close with our young squad and progressive coach, can surely mean that we will only get better having that right balance and development in place, whilst others around us are in transition again.

Even if we don't win the league, with a settled squad and a couple of key signings (not old man Ibra) I can see us signing one 'elite' level player to take us to that next level who can unlock those teams that we struggle against. I fancy us to challenge again next season. To top it off we have a crown jewel in the new stadium and state of the art training facilities. The future is very definitely bright indeed. Come on You Fucking Spurs!!!
 
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As for Hugo - not sure why he would want to move to PSG apart from the massive salary, being back in his native country, playing in their equivalent of wembley and being the national team captain.

Maybe looking around for a replacement might not be such a bad idea - after all.
I do wonder how interested any goalkeeper would be in joining a team that is currently 28 points clear at the top of the league.
 

Blanchflower

Supporter
Was thinking of the parallels between us and Utd in 1992 when they lost out to un-fancied Leeds led by Cantona, Strachan, McAllister, and Chapman. Utd came back the following year, in the inaugural Premier League season and after the master stroke signing of Cantona for about £1.7m they finally won that elusive league title. Coming this close with our young squad and progressive coach, can surely mean that we will only get better having that right balance and development in place, whilst others around us are in transition again.

Even if we don't win the league, with a settled squad and a couple of key signings (not old man Ibra) I can see us signing one 'elite' level player to take us to that next level who can unlock those teams that we struggle against. I fancy us to challenge again next season. To top it off we have a crown jewel in the new stadium and state of the art training facilities. The future is very definitely bright indeed. Come on You Fucking Spurs!!!
So Mahrez shags Vardy's wife, we sign Mahrez......we win the league next season
 
It was going so well until you thought that selling Lloris to get Butland was a good idea...and that buying Bale was even possible...
 
not sure he said it was a good idea - just one of life's inevitabilities.

If lloris decides to go home then I doubt there'd be much we could do to stop him, so why not mitigate against the inevitable?
 

Freudlyuchenko

Supporter
I'm not gay but $20 is $20
Leicester have likely secured the title this season, and good luck to them for fulfilling that fairy tale; they've proved that good old fashioned pragmatism and playing to your strengths rather than the obligatory 'good' football can neutralise financial supremacy, but ultimately they've overachieved and Spurs' continued progress under Pocchettino will gradually peak and sustain, finally filling void left by the Ferguson-era United as English football's next great dynasty.

The parallels between United in the early 90's and the current Tottenham team are startling; intense, principled managers who've paid their dues and worked their way up the ladder, who've weened the negative influences out of the club and established a young British core of the team who're developing in sync, ala the class of '92, alongside some shrewdly acquired foreign talent. Both are built on solid defensive foundations and play with width and dynamism, constantly switching the play and firing crosses into the box until the opposition succumb to the pressure. Another common element is the adulation they receive from Sky; Chelsea, Woolwich and City have all managed to attain a degree of success during the Sky Sports era, but they've never really been as emphatically embraced by them in the way United were, and in my opinion the reason are obvious and fully justified. Those clubs have all had an overly-cosmopolitan aura, and in the case of City and Chelsea a vulgar approach to buying the success with their benefactor's wealth with little regard to the overall benefit to the English game; this Spurs team, like that United one, has an authentic Anglo-identity that is greatly benefitting the English game and providing opportunity to young domestic talent, while gradually establishing success built on solid foundations via hard work, shrewd transfer strategy and impeccable standards imposed by the managers. United's demise means Sky need new poster boys to project, and humble starlets like Kane, Alli and Dier are the ideal candidates.

As a City fan back when we prided ourselves on being a 'proper' club, as well as an advocate of fundamental opportunity for English talent, it's been hard to watch the transition into an embodiment of everything that's wrong with modern football, and I've spent the past few years being told by the hypocritical morons that most of our fans have become that selling our arse to an Arab was 'the only way' we could compete with the established top 4, as well as the nonsense argument that English players aren't good enough in failed justification for the Anglo-apartheid at the club since the Hispanic colonisation in 2013, so I've been buzzing with what this Spurs team has been doing to disprove that idiotic misconception, even to the extent where I actually enjoyed you lot taking 6 points of us this season.

Moving forward, with the new stadium in the pipeline and the Nike investment in addition to the Champions League revenue, there is absolutely no reason for Pocchettino or any of the aforementioned uber-talents to leave; constant exposure to elite level football via International and European competition is going to facilitate their development into top-level footballers, and as a result see the club become a dominant force in English and even European football. The similarities in style and standards between former Argentina teammates Pocchettino and Diego Simeone are glaringly obvious, and Spurs can easily embrace and emulate Atletico's impact in the Champions League next season.

Guardiola is put on a pedestal for his achievements at Barca, but he's only every inherited great players at clubs with a culture of winning; Pocchettino is Pep without the privileges. Would Guardiola have matched Pocchettino's achievements with Espanyol, Southampton and the shambles of a Spurs squad he took over? Success is relative, and the Argentinians work so far has been as good as anybody else's in the the same timescale.

From what little I've seen of Winks, Pritchard and Edwards, they have the talent to be integrated into the squad within the next few seasons and Pocchettino will inevitably do so, further strengthening that success-defining identity in the process; the key to completing the transition from very good team to winning team will be the quality and compatibility of the signings....

United needed a catalyst for their own transition in the early 90's, a talisman to inspire and implement a winning mentality into a talented young team and they found it in Cantona; Ibrahimovic could be that player here. He's a perennial winner, who sets and demands from others the highest standards; Kane could attain career-defining advice and experience alongside such a player, taking his own career beyond even it's current stratospheric potential. He's got a few years left in him, wants a move to England and would destroy most Premier League defences.

PSG want Lloris and this summer would likely see his value peak given his age and the fact he'll be a key figure for a France team that I expect to make a big impact at Euro 2016, so it'd be a good time to sell; Jack Butland's career trajectory will see him as England's number one by the 2018 World Cup, and he has all the credentials to be a Spurs player (ie young, English and superbly talented) as well as the physical stature to dominate the box better than Hugo. He'd realistically be available for half of what PSG would pay for Lloris as well.

When Bale was sold in 2013, I imagine the first option clause was nothing more than Levy being awkward and Real obliging to be polite, but given the bizarre change in the footballing landscape in England since then, and especially Spurs currently being the best placed team to dominate domestically as well as become perennial participants in the Champions League, the possibility of a Bale return is a valid one.

Regardless of what actually happens in the summer transfer-wise, you club is on the cusp of greatness and is without question the pride of English football.
:freund:Just got to point out that Lloris has stated that he doesn't like the type of club that PSG and Monaco tried to be when links to a return to France were mooted.
 
I don't think Lloris wants to go 'home', what's the point of signing for PSG other than money. Lloris has shown in the past that he is a man of integrity and isn't likely to sign for a club that is financially doped.
 

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Don't see Lloris leaving until he has won something. He is committed under Poch and knows this team can and will win something big in the next season or two. He is young enough to move to PSG in a few seasons if he wants to return to France.

More and more I too think that Zlatan could work. I think the players would accept him as having a different role to the rest of the team because of his status. He is a winner and has an ego but a postive one. I would love to see it. Wages are often said to be the problem that mean it wont happen, but Levy may find a way round that, it may be he can just give him a large signing on fee and clauses about games played in case he got injured. It is no longer impossible anyway.

I don't see Bale returning just yet. Maybe once we have the new stadium and have been crowned champions already.

Either way, I agree we are set for bigger things in the coming seasons, we have stuff the other clubs don't. But don't discount Leicester. Yes, they have overachieved, and yes they have an old squad that will tire over the next two seasons, but if they can keep their best players (not sure they can) and if they can add new players that are right (seems likely they can) then they will be up there again next season too. Like us, they have built a team spirit that is genuine. The others, citeh, utd, chelsea, arse, don't have that. Liverpool will be much improved next season after a clear out, I'd have thought, but wont be challenging for the title as they lack the quality.
 
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